Kelsey Dayton

Recent Posts

Ski trip across Yellowstone reveals unique sounds of winter

Derek Collins takes in the view while skiing across Yellowstone National Park.

There are sounds in Yellowstone National Park that can only be heard in the winter, away from the snow machines and out of the snowcoaches. They are the squeak of cold snow underfoot and the whispered rhythm of skis pushing and gliding. They are the gurgle of thermal features and the splash of water descending from the air and returning to geyser pools, sounds too meek to hear above the din of throngs of people in summer. Continue Reading →

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Wildlife officials warn Yellowstone area grizzly bears expanding range, seeking food

Grizzly bear managers meet Dec. 10-11 in Missoula, mont.

As the population of grizzly bears in the greater Yellowstone area expands, grizzlies are expanding their range. That expansion, along with a year of low whitebark pine cone production—a staple of the grizzly’s diet—means outdoor enthusiasts need to be hyper-vigilant this fall, even when recreating in areas where they’ve never seen signs of bears. Continue Reading →

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Shoeshiner keeps old-school trade alive in Jackson bar

Tim Tetley works on Gordon Little’s boots at Tetley’s shoe-shine stand in the Cowboy Bar in Jackson, Wyo., south of Grand Teton National Park.

Walk into the Cowboy Bar, just south of Grand Teton National Park, on a busy night in the summer, and there might be a line of patrons waiting to climb into Tm Tetley’s shoe-shine chair. People take pictures as he scoots around on his stool, examining soles and whipping towels across the tops of boots until they gleam. For visitors it’s like a carnival ride to sit in the chair and have their footwear lathered back to pristine condition by someone dressed from an era passed, while in Jackson’s famous bar with its saddle seats. Continue Reading →

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Wyoming moose study focuses on large herd south of Grand Teton

A study on Wyoming’s largest moose herd could guide management decisions about oil and gas leasing in the Wyoming Range, south of Grand Teton National Park. The Wyoming Game and Fish Department, and the Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit recently expanded a moose project in the Northern Wyoming Range between Jackson and Pinedale. Continue Reading →

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Study: Yellowstone elk pregnancies stressed from poor nutrition, not wolves

A University of Wyoming study shows that elk don’t respond frequently enough to threats from wolves to impact body fat and pregnancy rates. Wolves’ effects on elk populations is limited to direct predation, not harassment or stress that leads to lower pregnancy rates or poor body composition, according to the study. Continue Reading →

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Underwater War: Killing lake trout to save cutthroat in Yellowstone Park

The Yellowstone Park Foundation funds a range of programs and projects, including a long-term effort to reduce lake trout populations in Yellowstone National Park.

Attempts to save Yellowstone cutthroat began when they were first discovered in Yellowstone Lake in 1994. Work reached a crescendo this year with organizations helping fund work and research on Yellowstone Lake where lake trout have particularly overwhelmed the world’s largest natural cutthroat population. A combination of sci-fi like technology and experiments coupled with good old fashioned fishing could help shrink the lake trout population and in turn allow the cutthroat to thrive. Continue Reading →

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Yellowstone’s Mirror Plateau: A world away from the boardwalks

At an elevation of about 9,000 feet and 3.5 miles from an established trail, Mirror Lake on Yellowstone’s Mirror Plateau is one of the park’s more remote destinations. (Bradly J. Boner/WyoFile — click to enlarge)

There are so many things in Yellowstone National Park that can make you feel physically small — the roaring waterfalls, geysers spraying more than 100 feet in the air and bison as big as a small car. But it is in the backcountry that you not only feel small, but also insignificant, a speck in a world that seems to expand into an immeasurable vastness. I’d never heard of the Mirror Plateau until I read about it in an outdoor magazine last winter. I was intrigued by the idea of the isolation within a place that draws millions of visitors each year. It isn’t just rugged; it’s trail-less. It isn’t just obscure; it’s unknown to most people. It isn’t just untrammeled; overnight travel is limited to only several weeks in the summer and 14 total permits. Continue Reading →

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