FEATURED

Members of the U.S. Army's 6th Cavalry pose with buffalo heads seized in 1894 from Cooke City poacher Edgar Howell. (NPS photo)

U.S. Army played critical early role in history of Yellowstone

The U.S. Army regulars in Yellowstone were generally a coarse bunch, trained on the western plains. At a monthly salary of $13, they were motivated less by pay than by “the tug of adventure.” They established the protective cover the park needed at the time to maintain its integrity as a preserve for nature and a playground for the public.

Proposed hike for Yellowstone entry fees draws mixed reviews

The experiences and memories gained from a trip to Yellowstone National Park my be priceless, but they don't come without a cost. And that cost will go up next year under a proposal being presented this week by park leaders. Yellowstone officials are meeting with residents in gateway communities this month as part of the public comment period on a proposal to restructure and raise the park's entrance fees, as well as to establish a new permit fee for overnight backcountry camping. Currently, visitors in a single, non-commercial vehicle entering either Grand Teton National Park or Yellowstone pay $25 for a 7-day pass valid at both parks. Under the newly proposed fee structure, Yellowstone visitors would pay $30 for a 3-day pass, or they could opt for a 7-day pass good at both parks for $50. Continue Reading →

Yellowstone visitation sets record for October

It was another record visitation month for Yellowstone National Park in October. A total of 194,804 recreational visitors came to Yellowstone last month, surpassing the previous October record of 189,072 set in 2010. The dramatic year-to-year difference in visitation figures between October 2014 and October 2013 reflects the 16 day park closure due to last October’s federal government shutdown. There were 3,483,608 recreational visits to Yellowstone in first ten months of 2014, an increase of 10.26% over the same period in 2013. Continue Reading →

Death In Yellowstone: True stories of park’s fatal perils

Yellowstone National Park historian Lee Whittlesey is the author of "Death In Yellowstone," a compilation of true stories about the park's fatal perils.

Don’t bother asking Lee Whittlesey about his favorite Yellowstone ghost stories. He doesn’t believe in ghosts. He doesn’t need to. The Yellowstone National Park historian knows horror stories far scarier than made-up specters. They are haunting, disturbing and particularly terrifying because they actually happened. These are the stories of people falling into boiling water, of wild animals attacking and feasting on flesh, and the unsolved mysteries as to whether a person fell or was pushed. Continue Reading →

Grand Teton set for seasonal road closures

Grand Teton National Park will close some of its roads to seasonal travel in preparation for winter.

Residents of Jackson, Wyo. and park visitors are reminded that two roads within Grand Teton National Park will close to vehicle traffic for the season on the evening of Friday, October 31, 2014. These seasonal closures include the length of the Teton Park Road between Taggart Lake parking area and Signal Mountain Lodge parking lot, as well as the Moose-Wilson Road between Granite Canyon and Death Canyon trailheads. In addition to the annual road closures, the Moose, Moran and Granite Canyon entrance stations will be temporarily closed for the month of November and early December. They are scheduled to reopen on December 15 for the winter season. Continue Reading →

Some Yellowstone roads set to close as season ends

Gardiner, Mont. lies at the northern edge of Yellowstone National Park, and is the historic original entrance to the park.

There are only a few days left to for motorists to drive into most of the interior of Yellowstone National Park before the roads close for the season. Roads to most of the park’s popular locations close to vehicle travel at 8 a.m. Monday, November 3. The exception is the road from the park’s North Entrance at Gardiner, Mont., through Mammoth Hot Springs, Wyo. to the park’s Northeast Entrance and the communities of Cooke City and Silver Gate, Mont. That road is open all year, weather permitting. Continue Reading →

Fashion, furniture shows from Cody’s ‘art week’ face uncertain future

Liz Holmes, left, looks on as furniture designer John Gallis helps Hilary Heminway build a stool during a 2008 workshop as part of the Cody High Style show. Gallis coached a dozen students at his Norseman Designs West workshop on how to create a stool in the style of Western design pioneer Thomas Molesworth.

A long-running showcase for local and regional designers of Western furniture and fashion faces an uncertain future after organizers announced they are stepping away from the program, which they say is costly to produce and has not met expectations for attendance and revenue. The Cody Country Chamber of Commerce announced Friday that the organization would not produce the annual Cody High Style show for fall 2015. The group had organized the series of events since 2011 as part of Cody's annual Rendezvous Royale. Continue Reading →

Study: grizzly bears can adapt diet to changing climate

A grizzly bear digs in wet dirt near Cub Creek in Yellowstone Na

For years, many conservationists have worried what grizzly bears in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem will eat as changing climate and habitat conditions bring fewer whitebark pine nuts, cutthroat trout and other prime food sources. A recent study offers an answer: almost anything else. Research by several state and federal wildlife biologists found that grizzlies across the Yellowstone area eat a total of 266 different species of plants and animals, and display an amazingly adaptable diet that ranges from moths to algae. Continue Reading →

Photographers sue to stop Grand Teton elk hunt

elk-front

Two Teton County photographers filed a lawsuit in Washington, D.C. Monday seeking to stop the annual elk hunt in Grand Teton National Park. Tim Mayo and Kent Nelson, operating as Wyoming Wildlife Advocates, target the “elk reduction program,” in which hunters killed 202 elk last year. The hunt also resulted in the shooting of a grizzly bear, a federally protected species, in 2012. The suit goes beyond hunting alone, challenging supplemental winter elk feeding on the nearby National Elk Refuge. The hunt violates a slew of federal laws, the suit claims, including the Grand Teton Act, the National Park Organic Act, the Endangered Species Act and National Environmental Policy Act. Continue Reading →

Grand Teton closes Jenny Lake trails during construction

Starting Monday, October 27, a temporary area closure will be in effect for several trails within the Jenny Lake area of Grand Teton National Park. Park officials say the temporary public closures are necessary to ensure public safety during construction activities involving helicopter-assisted transport of heavy material to trail locations on the west side of Jenny Lake. The public closure will last from October 27 through October 30, and possibly longer, according to a statement released by the park's public affairs office. Continue Reading →

Program helps gateway area businesses give back to Yellowstone

The Yellowstone Park Foundation is recruiting businesses across the greater Yellowstone area for a new program designed to help them give back to Yellowstone, and receive benefits in return. "Many area businesses have asked YPF how they can give back to Yellowstone, because the Park gives us all so much," said YPF President Karen Bates Kress. "When a business joins the program, their entire membership fee supports the Park, and can be directed to help a specific project." Kress will speak Monday during the Cody Club luncheon at noon at the club room of the Cody Auditorium, offering details on the program for interested local business owners. Continue Reading →